Jessica Traynor: Three Poems

On #PoetryDayIRL I’m really glad to have three new poems featured on the Rochford Street Review.

Rochford Street Review

Biographical NoteContemporary Irish Poetry Index

Contents

Matches for Rosa
In Bath Cathedral
The Swarm

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Matches for Rosa
‘I want to give it to Rosa Luxemburg, who loved birds and flames.’
………………………………………………………………….– John Berger

These matches are a gift for Rosa –
I’ll send her a text first, so she will expect them
where she lives now, in a room
on the other side of water.

Even the dead can light a fire with the right tinder,
like these matryoshka matchboxes –
each one hiding a smaller lacquered case,
and a painted Russian songbird.

Perhaps each bird with its sloe-deep eyes,
its harlequin flashes of scarlet or gold
will be reborn as a phoenix in that other place;
where the dead live, sparks catch quicker,

and maybe in return for my gift,
this woman so in love with fire and flight
will send her blazing birds to my…

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#PoetryDayIRL 2017 & LABEL-LIT

Looking forward to being part of this great project led by poet Maria McManus on International Poetry Day this Thursday!

Label Lit

Label-Lit is a micro-literature response to the world. The purpose is to share small works of literature, on luggage labels, in public spaces.

tag 13

The aim is to share the written word, so whether it is poetry, a maxim, a gut response, a shout out, the quiet voice, a comfort, a gentle confrontation, or just the plain truth, Label-Lit is intended to be shared and is intended to encourage people in other places to connect in evocative, gentle, human ways through literary art and poetry.

For Poetry Day in Ireland 2017, I am co-working with more than 20 other poets to bring LabelLit to public space. I’d initially sought 10 others, but when enthusiastic requests came in, I couldn’t help but respond and include a few more people. So, what’s happening?

Who Are The POETS????

We are a group with participants across all of the island of Ireland, but also Portugal…

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Canvassing for Votes at Saboteur Awards 2017

Sbotage

Earlier this month, I had the lovely surprise of being nominated for Best Reviewer at this year’s Saboteur Awards. I was really touched by this; I work away on the reviews and they get put up there and I’m proud of them, but generally I don’t have a lot of time to publicise them. So it’s really gratifying to see they’ve been noticed.

There are a number of reasons why I started to review for Sabotage Reviews. As a poet flogging a debut collection, I came up against the usual challenges of getting my own work reviewed; a number of reviewers are friends/ colleagues, so you can’t ask them, many mainstream outlets have little or no funding for poetry reviews, the general lack of a massive poetry reading audience. I did of course also have plenty of successes and good reviews, for which I am forever grateful!

But the experience got me thinking about poetry reviewing and how necessary it is to have people out there reviewing work – for the health of poetry in general. I was intrigued by Sabotage Reviews, a collection of brilliant selfless people who review work just for the joy of reading new poetry, and so I got in touch to see if they would have me. Being Irish and based in Ireland, I was also eager to review work that came from another country. That meant less risk of conflict of interest, and also the golden opportunity to read new work from a very different milieu. Since I’ve started reviewing for Sabotage Reviews, I’ve read new work from all across the UK and the USA. It’s been a pleasure.

There’s a spotlight on the nominated best reviewers here. I’m shamelessly pulling some lovely quotes people left about my work when they voted:

Why voters think she should win:

  • Committed, passionate and fair-minded – a force for good in poetry on the page and off.
  • A bright and forensic voice
  • Jess gets what reviewing is meant to be about: discussing works on their own terms, with a sensitive, empathetic and nuanced critical faculty.
  • She is balanced and remarkably frank

As I said above, I really admire the Sabotage Reviews Project. Everyone involved is donating their time for free, for the good of the written and spoken word. I’d love you to vote for me of course, but do have a look at the other nominees and categories too. There’s lots of great work in there that deserves to be recognised.

Vote here 

Feature on Pablo Neruda on RTÉ’s Arena

I had a great time reading some extracts from Pablo Neruda’s work and talking about his life on RTÉ’s Arena last Friday. The poems are such a joy to read, it’s difficult not to get carried away by their passion and music. You can listen back here.

Neruda

I’m also looking forward to seeing the new Pablo Larraín biopic (image above), but see it’s just been panned in the Guardian…great reviews elsewhere so I might take a chance. I like the magic realist stylistic approach and I think I’ll be happy to forgive any artistic licence taken in pursuit of a good yarn.

Reviews of ‘Stranger, Baby’ by Emily Berry and ‘The Unaccompanied’ by Simon Armitage on RTÉ’s Arena

I’ve been lucky enough to review some excellent work this year so far for Arena, and these two starkly different collections stood out for me.

You can have a listen to my thoughts on Emily Berry’s dark and compelling Stranger, Baby here.

And my thoughts on Simon Armitage’s The Unaccompanied here. I’d some (enjoyable) arguments with this one, and it certainly feels like a collection for our times.

Robert Lowell Profile on RTÉ’s Arena

RL

 

On the 2nd of March I visited RTÉ’s Arena to do a profile on Robert Lowell for the week of his centenary.

Lowell was a poet I thought I knew, but it was great to have an opportunity to revisit the work with the intention of trying to put together a broad overview of the work. Time flies on live radio, but I did manage to squeeze in readings of some of my favourite poems.

There are some interesting books on Lowell published this year, including a new biography by Kay Redfield Jamsion, which pays particular attention to his psychology.

You can listen to the feature here.